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What Cables Do I Need for my TV?

There could be many different reasons for you to check out this informative guide on what cables you need for your TV – perhaps you’ve bought a new piece of AV equipment, or you’ve bought a completely new TV. You may have also decided to have a look where all the cords are and wondered whether you really need them all. Whatever the reason, this TV cable guide is going to help you figure out exactly what you need to make your TV work.

tv cables

Visual and Audio Cables

The cables we’ve outlined below can offer both audio and visual features for your television. Let’s take a look:

Component Cable:

If you want a great picture quality on your TV, then you’ll want to get a component cable. It’s actually five cables, and they are red, blue and green.

RCA or Phono:

This is the final type of audio and visual cable connection, and is a yellow connection that is used for stereo sound. If your equipment doesn’t come with an HDMI connection, then you’ll want one of these as they are the next best option. They also serve to help replace SCART cables, which is also the purpose of HDMI.

HDMI:

this is one of the most common TV cables available. HDMI stands for High Definition Multimedia Interface, and it is responsible for providing your TV with high definition quality as well as a good audio connection between your TV and audio equipment. HDMI cables are being improved on all the time, so you may want to consider updating yours if it’s an older model.

SCART:

This is what HDMI cables used to be – however, they can still be relevant in certain circumstances. You may want to use them if you’ve still got a DVD player or even a VCR. They are easily recognizable because they have a big, bulky connector at the end.

usb cables

Visual Cables

Now that we’ve covered audio-only cables, let’s take a look at visual only options:

DVI:

This stands for digital video connection cable that is capable of producing HD video. It is compatible with HDMI for your TV – however, it is an older version, so a lot of modern TVs don’t come with a DVI connection.

S-Video:

This type of visual cable is not the most popular, however there will be some scenarios where it could come in handy. Because it’s an analog connection, it can help to differentiate the brightness and color of your TV so that you get a high picture quality. However, if you have an RGB, you can easily get a much better picture quality, which is why these cables aren’t too popular.

Audio Cables

We’ve talked about cables that provide both audio and visual features. Now, let’s take a look at cables that provide audio features only:

Phono:

You will recognize the phono cable because it will come with a white and red lead. These are used to link the TV to an audio sound system. This will give you stereo sound, and each cable is used for a speaker.

Auxiliary:

This type of cable is used in the headphone jack of your television. It’s used to connect sound to soundbars, but because it only offers one sound channel, its use is limited. Another downside is that some TVs will mute the sound on the screen when you’re using a cable like this.

Optical:

This is the most common audio connection currently – if you’re not using HDMI to with your audio, this is your next best option. It is a fibre optic cable that sends its signal through light and is great if you have a surround sound audio system.

Coaxial:

This audio cable is a cross between a phono and an optical and is used for stereo sound. It’s a digital connection and is typically thicker than most audio cables to protect it from interference with other digital signals. This is another cable you’ll want to get for surround sound.

cables into back of tv

Other Cables

Now that we’ve covered the basics in all three categories, let’s take a look at any other leads you may need for your TV setup:

Ethernet:

All modern TVs come with an ethernet input, which allows you to stream the internet on your TV. While many TVs these days are compatible with WiFi, a lot of them still come with this connection so you can stream the internet on your television.

RF Leads:

This is the cable you need if you want to watch a live TV broadcast. If you’ve got a TV aerial socket, you will need a cable like this to connect it to the TV. Most modern TVs have this connection.

USB:

If your TV is modern, then it should have a couple of USB inputs where you can connect a USB cable. This can be used to watch a number of different things, from family videos to still photos. USB inputs are also great for upgrading things on your TV.

What Cable Does my TV Aerial Need?

To ensure that your aerial fitting goes smoothly, you need to consider what cable does your tv aerial actually need. Generally speaking, you’ll need a TV aerial plug. This is a connector that’s used to link coaxial cables with one another, as well as link them up with terrestrial roof antennas. This is your best bet at having a working TV that’s connected to the TV aerial so that you can pick up the correct signals for your region.

You might also be interested in knowing more about freesat dish installation – if so click on the link for more information.